Articles Tagged with E-Cig dangers

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In 2018 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) expanded its 2014 “The Real Cost” campaign, which educates at-risk teens on the dangers of tobacco use, to educate teens on the dangers of E-Cigarette use.  Now the FDA is considering taking these dangerous products off the market altogether.

Alarmingly:

  • Among middle and high school students, 3.62 million were current users of e-cigarettes in 2018.[1]
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Electronic cigarettes continue to grow in popularity despite significant health dangers.  According to the CDC (Center for Disease Control) “E-cigarettes produce an aerosol by heating a liquid that usually contains nicotine, flavorings, and other chemicals that help to make the aerosol.”[1] Electronic cigarettes come in a variety of sweet flavors and are being designed to be discrete. As many readers may be aware, a highly popular electronic cigarette, JUUL is designed to look like USB drives.  “According to the manufacturer, a single JUUL pod contains as much nicotine as a pack of 20 regular cigarettes.”[2]

As the popularity of electronic cigarettes grows so does our knowledge of the health risks.  A recent study from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds association between electronic cigarette use and myocardial infarction (heart attacks).  The surveys found that “Daily e-cigarette use was independently associated with increased odds of having had a myocardial infarction.”[3]

A UC San Francisco survey of nearly 70,000 people found that every day use of e-cigarettes can nearly double the odds of a heart attack. [4]  “While e-cigarettes deliver lower levels of carcinogens than conventional cigarettes, they both deliver ultrafine particles – which are 1/50 to 1/100 the size of human hair – and other toxins that have been linked to increased cardiovascular and non-cancer lung disease risks.”[5]

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In the past decade, E-Cigarettes or Vaping has become almost commonplace.  From those who feel it is a safe alternative to smoking, a good method to quitting, or the new social “it” thing to do, everyone from teenagers to adults are using it.

The produce essentially heats a liquid that goes into an aerosol which the user inhales.  The products side effects are not limited to ultrafine particles that can be inhaled deep into the lungs with flavorants such as diacetyl a chemical that has been linked to serious lung disease.

Just read this quote from a young adult from an article recently published by NBC News: