Articles Tagged with “nyc accident lawyer”

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On March 15th, 2020 our State and City closed due to the COVID-19 crisis.  Many businesses were shut and sadly thousands of New Yorkers were unemployed or furloughed.  Many of those were clients of Leav & Steinberg, LLP.  Those clients had been seriously injured prior to this health crisis and had relied upon Leav & Steinberg and its staff to be there to help them obtain complete justice.  While our firm had to work remotely, our entire staff and attorneys committed to continuing the tradition we have had for the last 21 years: By providing excellent lawyering and exceptional customer service Leav & Steinberg, will be the premier firm in New York for representing all New Yorker’s who have been injured and deserve justice.  Below is just a sampling of the matters we have resolved during the COVID-19 crisis up to April 29th, 2020.

  1. $812,000.00 settlement at a virtual court conference and virtual mediation for a 65 year-old retired Department of Education aide.  Client slipped a fell on water leaking from a hole in the lobby of her building caused by a plumbing leak.  The building owner and a contractor were aware of the condition prior to the accident.  Client did not report the accident but did seek emergency treatment the next day for neck pain.  Client eventually underwent cervical spinal surgery.  The defense argued her cervical problems were pre-existing as she had treated for her neck and her lower back prior to this.  The client was on dialysis and was suffering from other unrelated illnesses.  Further, unrelated to the accident, the client was diabetic, suffered renal failure, and was on was on dialysis.
  2. $225,000.00 settlement at virtual mediation for a Plaintiff was lawfully operating her motor vehicle when she was rear ended by a truck.  The truck argued that it did not see the plaintiff’s vehicle and as a result our firm moved and won summary judgment.  The client sustained a knee injury and underwent arthroscopic surgery; but no tear was found.  We were able to show the films and reports to an expert radiologist who opined that other injuries were sustained.
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Exploding cars are de rigueur in action movies. But in real life, it is pretty scary. Think about the Ford Pinto and one pictures exploding gas tanks. This was used to great comic effect in the movie “Top Secret,” a parody of WWII spy movies. But there have been “32 rear-impact collisions that caused fatal fires resulting in 44 deaths in Grand Cherokees, and five accidents that resulted in seven deaths in Jeep Libertys” according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

The Investigation

On August 23, 2010, NHTSA opened an investigation into possible fuel tank explosions during rear-end collision and impacts. This investigation covered Jeep Grand Cherokees for model years 1993 to 2004, Jeep Cherokees for model years 1993 to 2001, and Jeep Libertys for model years 2002 to 2007. This investigation started as a safety defect investigation, but was upgraded to an engineering analysis to determine if the “vehicles contain a defect that presents an unreasonable risk to safety.” NHTSA said the design of the vehicle with “the location of the gas tanks behind the rear axle of the Jeeps could make them more vulnerable to being ruptured in an accident.”

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Would a car accident involving a driverless car be covered by New York’s no-fault insurance law? (N.Y. ISC Law § 5103) What if a car could drive itself? You could read the New York Times or Wall Street Journal from the driver’s seat or work on your personal computer while HAL drives you to work. (2001: A Space Odyssey) Think about removing human error to reduce the 93 percent of accidents that occur due to human error, a total of 34,000 traffic deaths.

The current journey

Back in 2008, General Motors announced the establishment of the Collaborative Research lab between GM and Carnegie Mellon University to work together to develop a driverless vehicle. Carnegie Mellon faculty from the School of Computer Science and College of Engineering work with GM Research and Development to work “on technologies that will accelerate the emerging field of autonomous driving – a family of electronics and software technologies that could influence the way drivers and their vehicles interact in the future.”

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